In the biblical Books of Kings (2 Kings 18:4; written c. 550 BC), the Nehushtan (Hebrew: . mw-parser-output . script-hebrew,. mw-parser-output . script-Hebr{font-family:”SBL Hebrew”,”SBL BibLit”,”Frank Ruehl CLM”,”Taamey Frank CLM”,”Ezra SIL”,”Ezra SIL SR”,”Keter Aram Tsova”,”Taamey Ashkenaz”,”Taamey David CLM”,”Keter YG”,”Shofar”,”David CLM”,”Hadasim CLM”,”Simple CLM”,”Nachlieli”,Cardo,Alef,”Noto Serif Hebrew”,”Noto Sans Hebrew”,”David Libre”,David,”Times New Roman”,Gisha,Arial,FreeSerif,FreeSans}נחשתן‎ Nəḥuštān [nəħuʃtaːn]) is the derogatory name given to the bronze serpent on a pole first described in the Book of Numbers which God told Moses to erect so that the Israelites who saw it would be protected from dying from the bites of the “fiery serpents”, which God had sent to punish them for speaking against him and Moses (Numbers 21:4–9). In Kings, King Hezekiah institutes an iconoclastic reform that requires the destruction of “the brazen serpent that Moses had made; for unto those days the children of Israel did burn incense to it; and it was called Nehushtan”. The term is a proper noun coming from either the word for “snake” or “brass”, and thus means “The (Great) Serpent” or “The (Great) Brass”.

The bronze snake coloring page, .